World Athletics Championships - Women's Track Events Preview

World Athletics Championships – Women’s Track Events Preview

World Athletics Championships – Women’s Track Events Preview – World Athletics Championships 2022 event by event preview for women’s track events.

For the first time in history the United States is hosting the World Athletics outdoor championships held in Eugene, Oregon from July 15 to July 24.

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100 metres: 

The Jamaican trio formed by Shelly Ann Fraser Pryce, Elaine Thompson-Herah and Shericka Jackson is set to dominate the women’s 100 metres.

Fraser Pryce set the three fastest times of the season, clocking 10.67 in Nairobi and in the Paris Diamond League  and 10.70 in the heats of the Jamaican Trials in Kingston. She did not run the final of the National Championships as she has the wild card of the Championships. Last year the “Pocket Rocket” set the third fastest time in history clocking 10.60 in Lausanne.

She is aiming to win her fifth 100m world title. Her collection includes nine individual and relay world gold medals, two world silver medals and three Olympic gold medals.

Five-time Olympic champion Elaine Thompson Herah won the past two editions of the Prefontaine Classic in Eugene in 10.54 in 2021 (the second fastest time in history) and in her seasonal best of 10.79 in 2022.

Shericka Jackson won the Jamaican Trials final in 10.77 beating last year’s NCAA 60m indoor champion Kemba Nelson (10.86) and Thompson Herah (10.89). Jackson won two bronze medals in the 100 metres in 10.76 and in the 4×400 relay and the gold medal in the 4×100 relay at the Olympic Games in Tokyo. The 27-year-old Jamaican sprinter has run under 11 seconds in each of her last four races and placed third at the Prefontaine Classic in Eugene in 10.92.

Melissa Jefferson won the US Championships final in Eugene in a wind-assisted 10.69 (+2.9 m/s) beating 2018 US champion Aleia Hobbs (10.72) and Twanisha Terry (10.74).

Marie Josée Ta Lou won three world medals (silver in the 100m and 200m in London 2017 and bronze in the 100m in Doha 2019) and finished fourth in the Olympic final in Tokyo after equalling the African record with 10.78 in the heats.

Dina Asher Smith will chase her second 100m world medal three years after finishing second in Doha setting the British record with 10.83. Asher Smith, who won the world under 20 title in 2014 on the Hayward Field, won the Birmingham Diamond League 100m race in 11.11 and placed fourth at the Prefontaine Classic in her seasonal best of 10.98.

Darryl Neita showed her good form by winning the British 100m title in a wind-assisted 10.80 in Manchester ahead of Asher Smith (10.87).

Mujinga Kambundji placed sixth in the Olympic 100m final in 10.99 and won the world 60m indoor gold medal setting the fourth fastest time in history with 6.96. The 30-year-old Swiss star improved Ajla Del Ponte’s national 100m record clocking 10.89 at the National Championships in Zurich last June.

Another European sprinter with a seasonal best under the 11 seconds barrier is Gina Luckenkemper, who won the German 100m title in Berlin in 10.99.

200 metres:

Shericka Jackson will face Abby Steiner for the first time in their careers in the women’s 200 metres in one of the most eagerly anticipated clashes of the World Championships in Eugene.

Steiner won the NCAA outdoor title for the University of Kentucky in Eugene in 21.80 and improved her own world leading time to 21.77 in the final of the US Championships on the same track two weeks later. Steiner moved into the top 20 in the world all-time list. The 22-year-old will make her first appearance for the US team in the first ever edition of the World Championships on US soil.

A few hours later Jackson won the Jamaican title in Kingston in 21.55 setting the third fastest time in history. Jackson missed the Jamaican record by just 0.02. Only Florence Griffith Joyner and Elaine Thompson Herah ran faster in history. Jackson also won the Diamond League 200m race in 21.91 in Rome beating Thompson Herah and Asher Smith.

Jackson won two world bronze medals in the 400m in Beijing 2015 and Doha 2019 and gold medal with the 4×400 relay in 2015 and in the 4×100 in 2019.

Thompson Herah won her second consecutive Olympic 200 metres gold medal setting the second fastest time in history with 21.53 in Tokyo but she has never won an individual world title. She achieved her best result at the World Championships in Beijing 2015 when she won the silver medal in 21.66 behind Dafne Schippers.

She placed second at the Jamaican Championships in Kingston setting her fastest time this season with 22.05. Fraser Pryce, who won the world 200m title in Moscow 2013 and the Olympic silver medal in London 2012, qualified with a third place at the Jamaican Championships in 22.14.

Tamara Clarke qualified for the US team with her second place in her lifetime best of 21.92 one year after finishing fourth at the US. Olympic Trials in 21.98.

Former University of Oregon student Jenna Prandini qualified for her first world championships team since 2015 by finishing third at the US Championships in 22.01.

Defending champion Dina Asher Smith finished third in Doha in 22.37 and in Rome in a seasonal best of 22.27 and won in Stockolm in 22.37 in her three Diamond League appearances over this distance this year.

Mujinga Kambundji set the Swiss 200m record clocking 22.18 in her home city Berne and placed second to Asher Smith in Stockolm in a close photo-finish. Kambundji won the 200m at last year’s edition of the Prefontaine Classic in a wind-assisted 22.06 and finished seventh in the Olympic final in 22.30 in Tokyo.

Marie Josée Ta Lou and Shaunae Miller Uibo won world silver and bronze medal in the 200m in London 2017. Miller Uibo set her national record in the 200m of 21.74 in Zurich in 2019.

Nigeria’s 19-year-old Favour Ofili improved her PB to 21.98 in Gainesville on 15 April and placed second to Steiner in 22.06 at the NCAA Finals in Eugene. Ofili won the world under 20 bronze medal in Nairobi in 22.23. She is the only sprinter, who has beaten Steiner this year at the South Eastern Conference.

400 metres: 

Double Olympic 400 metres Shaunae Miller Uibo is seeking her first world outdoor title in the one-lap event. The 28-year-old Bahamian star has won two world silver medals over this distance in Beijing 2015 and Doha 2019.

Last year Miller Uibo won the Olympic gold medal in Tokyo in 48.36.

She won her first world indoor gold medal in Belgrade last March beating Femke Bol. Last spring she set the third fastest time in the world this year clocking 49.91 at the Tom Jones Invitational in Gainesville.

Miller Uibo finished third in Doha in 51.84 to suffer her first defeat in a Diamon League race since 2015. One month later she won in the Paris Diamond League meeting in 50.10. Earlier this year Miller Uibo said that she could compete in the 200m at the Olympic Games in Paris 2024.

Miller Uibo will renew her rivalry against Marileidy Paulino from Dominican Republic, who won the Olympic silver in Tokyo in a national record of 49.20. Paulino won two Diamond League races in Doha 51.20 beating the Bahamian sprinter and in Rabat in 50.05. Paulino set a world leading time of 49.49 in the 400m in La Nucia and a national record of 22.59 in the 200m in Savona.

US 19-year-old Talitha Diggs could be in contention for a medal after winning both the NCAA Finals in 49.22 and the US Championships title in 50.22 this year. Diggs is the daughter of four-time 800m Olympian Joetta Clarke Diggs and niece of Hazel Clarke.

The Jamaican team is formed by 21-year-old Charokee Young, who is ranked second in the world with her PB of 49.87 set in Gainesville and finished second to Diggs at the NCAA Championships in 50.65, national champion Candice McLeod, who finished fifth at the Olympic Games in Tokyo, and veteran Stephanie Ann McPherson, third at the World Championships in Moscow 2013 and fifth at the Olympic Games in Tokyo.

The best European athlete in the field is Poland’s Natalia Kaczmarek, who clocked 50.16 this year at the Golden Spike meeting in Ostrava. The Polish athlete won the gold medal in the 4×400 mixed relay and the silver in the 4×400 relay at the Olympic Games in Tokyo.

100 metres hurdles: 

Olympic champion Jasmine Camacho Quinn will face world record holder Kendra Harrison. Both hurdlers will aim at winning the first world outdoor title in their careers.

Camacho Quinn set the Olympic record and the fourth fastest time in history clocking 12.26 in the semifinal before winning the final in 12.37 in Tokyo becoming the first athlete from Puerto Rico to win an Olympic gold medal in athletics. Camacho Quinn has claimed eight of her nine 100m hurdles races, including three Wanda Diamond League races in Eugene in 12.45, Rome in 12.37 and Stockolm in 12.46, and three Continental Tour Gold races at the Bermuda Games (12.67), Ostrava (12.56) and Chorzow (12.43).

Harrison won the US Championships final in Eugene setting the world lead of 12.34 beating Aleysha Johnson by 0.01. Johnson moved to fifth place on the all-time US performer list. Aila Armstrong secured the third qualifying spot for the World Championships with 12.47. Harrison won five US titles, the world indoor title in the 60m hurdles in Birmingham 2018 and placed second at the World Championships in Doha 2019 and Tokyo 2021.

Nia Ali clocked a seasonal best of 12.49, but she did not take part in the final, as she has a wild card into the World Championships as reigning world champion from Doha 2019.

Another strong medal contender is Tobi Amusan from Nigeria, who won the gold medal at the Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast 2018 and the Diamond League Final in Zurich in an African record of 12.42. Amusan placed fourth at the World Championships in Doha 2019 and at the Olympic Games in Tokyo 2021. This year the Nigerian hurdler won a Diamond League race in Paris Charlety setting the fourth fastest time and finished runner-up to Camacho Quinn in Stockolm in 12.50.

The strong Jamaican contingent is formed by Britany Anderson, who set a seasonal best of 12.45 at the Jamaican Championships, Olympic bronze medallist Megan Tapper and Danielle Williams, who won the world bronze medal in Doha and set her PB of 12.32 in London in 2019.

The other candidates for a spot in the final are world indoor silver medallist Davynne Charlton from the Bahamas, who set her seasonal best of 12.60 at the National Championships in Nassau, Nadine Visser from the Netherlands, two-time European Indoor champion and fifth placer in the Olympic final in Tokyo, Cyrena Samba Mayela, world indoor champion in the 60m hurdles in 7.78, European Indoor finalist Pia Skrzyszowska from Poland, who improved her PB to 12.62 at the National Championships this year, and Cindy Sember from Great Britain, European Indoor silver medallist in Torun 2021.

400 metres hurdles: 

Olympic champion Sydney McLaughlin broke her own world record by 0.05 clocking 51.41 in the final of the US Championships in Eugene last June. Mclaughlin set two more world records clocking 51.90 at the US Olympic Trials in Eugene and 51.46 in the Olympic Games final in Tokyo beating Dalilah Muhammad both times. McLaughln also holds the world under 18 record with 54.15 and the world under 20 with 53.60.

McLaughlin opened her 2022 with 12.75 in the 100m hurdles at the Penn Relays in Philadelphia.and 51.61 in the 400m hurdles in Nashville. At the US Championships she won by a huge margin of 1.6 seconds over Britton Wilson, who improved her PB to 53.08. Shamier Little secured the third qualifying spot with 53.92. Little won the world silver medal in Beijing 2015 and set the fifth fastest time in history with 52.39 in Stockolm last year.

Dalilah Muhammad has skipped the US Championships due to a harmstring injury, but she has a bye into the World Championships as reigning world champion from Doha 2019, when she broke the world record with 52.16 beating McLaughlin by 0.07.Muhammad set the second fastest time in history clocking 51.58 in the Olympic final in Tokyo.

Femke Bol won the Olympic bronze medal improving the European record to 52.03 and could become the third woman in history to join the 51-second barrier. The Dutch hurdler has remained unbeaten in her four 400 metres hurdles races this season in Hengelo (53.94), Rome (53.02), Oslo (52.61) and Stockolm (52.27) and set the world all-time best in the 300 metres hurdles with 36.86 in Ostrava.

The Jamaican contingent is formed by Shiann Salmon, Janieve Russell and 2019 world bronze medallist Rushell Clayton. Russell won the Jamaican title in Kingston in 53.63 beating Salmon, who improved her PB to 53.82, and Clayton, third in 54.20.

Line Kloster from Norway set the Norwegian record of 53.91 at altitude in La Chaux de Fonds.

Anna Rhyzhikova and Viktoriya Tkachuk finished fifth and sixth in the Olympic final in Tokyo and are contenders for a spot in the final if they replicate their performances in Eugene. Ryzhikova finished third in three Diamond League races in Rome (54.50), Oslo (54.81) and Stockolm (54.33).

The other athletes to watch are Gianna Woodruff, who placed seventh in the Olympic final in Tokyo and set a seasonal best of 54.35 in New York, Ayomide Folorunso from Italy, who won the national title in Rieti in 54.60 and finished fourth in Stockolm in 54.66, and Sara Gallego from Spain, who broke the national record with 54.34 at the National Championships in Nerja.

800 metres: 

Athing Mu Is aiming to become the first ever world champion from the USA at the World Championships in Eugene in front of her home fans.

Mu won the Olympic gold medal in Tokyo last year in a US record of 1:55.21 beating her fellow teenager Keely Hodgkinson, who broke Kelly Holmes’ long standing British record clocking 1:55.88. On that occasion Mu became the second US woman in history to win the Olympic medal.

They have turned 20 since then and are ready to renew their rivalry.

On the Hayward Field track Mu improved her PB to 49.57 to win the 400m NCAA title and won the US Olympic Trials in 1:56.07. Two months later she won the 800m at the Prefontaine Classic improving the North American record to 1:55.04.

Last June Mu claimed the win in Rome in a world leading time of 1:57.01 in her first Diamond League race outside the United States. She went on to win her second consecutive US title in 1:57.16 beating this year’s world indoor champion and two-time world outdoor silver medallist Ajée Wilson, who set a seasonal best of 1:57.23. Olympic bronze medallist Raevyn Rogers secured the third qualifying spot in 1:57.96. Rogers won the world silver medal in Doha 2019 ahead of Wilson.

Hodgkinson started the indoor season with a win in the Birmingham Indoor Grand Prix with 1:57.20 last February, but she was forced to pull out of the World Indoor Championships in Belgrade. The 20-year-old British middle-distance star bounced back this year with three consecutive Diamond League wins in Birmingham (1:58.63), Eugene (1:57.72) and Oslo (1:57.71). She had to settle with second place to Kenyan 22-year-old rising star Mary Moraa in her most recent race in 1:58.18.

Moraa, a world under 18 silver medallist in the 400 metres, won the 800 metres at the Kenyan Trials in a PB of 1:57.45 and broke the 1:58 barrier clocking 1:57.68 in Stockolm beating Hodgkinson. Moraa also won the 400 metres at the Kenyan Trials in Nairobi in 50.84, but she will focus only on the 800 metres.

Uganda’s Haliamah Naakayi will defend her world title won in Doha. Naakayi improved her national record to 1:58.03 and won the bronze medal at the World Indoor Championships in Belgrade.

Twenty-year-old Ethiopian runner Diribe Welteji can fight for a spot on the podium. Welteji won the world under 20 title in the 800m in Tampere 2018 and the world under 20 silver medal in the 1500m in Nairobi 2021. She set  a PB of 1:58.28 in the Continental Tour Gold meeting in Chorzow.

Prudence Sekgodiso from South Africa made her breakthrough last May when she set her PB of 1:58.41 in the Continental Tour Gold meeting In Nairobi.

Two-time European silver medallist Renelle Lamote from France placed second in Rome in 1:58.48 and third in Oslo in 1:58.50.

Jemma Reekie finished fourth at the Olympic Games in Tokyo improving her PB to 1:56.90. The Scottish middle-distance runner set a seasonal best of 1:58.44 in Chorzow.

Natoya Goule placed eighth in the Olympic final in Tokyo in 1:58.26 and won the Diamond League meeting in Brussels in 1:58.09. This year the Jamaican athlete finished fourth at the World Indoor Championships in Belgrade.

The other names to watch are Hirut Meshesha from Ethiopia, world indoor bronze medallist in Belgrade in the 1500m last March, Elena Bellò from Italy, third in the Rome Diamond League meeting in her PB of 1:58.97, Rose Mary Almanza, who set her PB to 1:58.28 in Stockolm last year.

1500 metres: 

Faith Kipyegon will chase her second world title five years after her triumph in London 2017. She also won two world silver medals in Beijing 2015 and Doha 2019.

Kipyegon won her second consecutive Olympic gold medal in the 1500m in Tokyo setting the Olympic record with 3:53.11 and set the fourth fastest time in history clocking 3:51.07 in the Monaco Diamond League meeting. The 27-year-old Kenyan middle-distance star crowned a very successful season with a win in the Wanda Diamond League final in Zurich beating Sifan Hassan last September.

Last May Kipyegon won the 1500m at the Prefontaine Classic in Eugene in a world leading time of 3:52.59 on a cool day. She also won the 800m in Hengelo in 2:00.36 and finished second in the 3000m in the Doha Diamond League in 8:38.05 and in the 800m in the Kenyan Trials in Nairobi in 1:58.18.

Last year’s Olympic 5000m and 10000m champion Sifan Hassan made a late debut to the season with a 15:13.41 in the 5000m in Portland after health issues slowed her preparation to the World Championships. Hassan is entered for both the 5000m and 10000m in Eugene.

Gudaf Tsegay from Ethiopia will chase her second world medal this year after winning the 1500m at the World indoor Championships in Belgrade. She will aim to become the second Ethiopian athlete to win the world title in the 1500m after Genzebe Dibaba in Beijing 2015. Tsegay placed second in the 1500m in 3:54.21 in Eugene and in the 5000m in 14.26.69 in Oslo. The Ethiopian team will be completed by Freweyny Hailu (fourth in the 1500m at the Olympic Games in Tokyo and second in the 800m in the World Indoor Championships in Belgrade) and Hirut Meshesha (world indoor bronze medallist in the 1500m in Belgrade and winner of back-to-back Diamond League races in in the 1500m in Rabat and Rome this year).

Laura Muir will aim to win her first world outdoor medal one year after finishing second to Kipyegon in Tokyo in a British record of 3:54.60. This year the Scottish star won the 1500m in Birmingham in 4:02.81and placed second in the 800m in Oslo in 1:58.09 and third in the 1500m in Rome in 4:04.93.

The US team will be formed by Sinclaire Johnson, Elle St. Pierre and Cory McGee. Johnson took the win at the US Championships and finished fourth in the 1500m in 3:58.86 at the Prefontaine Classic. St. Pierre won the world indoor silver medal in the 3000m in Belgrade.

The Australian hopes are carried by Jessica Hull, Linden Hall and Georgia Griffith. Hall placed sixth in the Olympic final last year and holds a seasonal best of 4:00.58. Hull set national records in the mile and in the 3000m and placed fifth in 3:59.31 in Eugene. Griffith set her PB of 4:00.16 in Rabat this year.

The other names to watch are Winnie Nanyondo from Uganda, fourth in the 1500m at the World Indoor Championships in Belgrade, and Gaia Sabbatini from Italy, who ran 4:02.25 in the 1500m Olympic semifinal last year and set her PB of 4:01.93 at the Prefontaine Classic in Eugene last May.

5000 metres:

A new world champion is set to be crowned in Eugene. Ejgayehu Taye leads a very strong Ethiopian team that includes world record holder Letesenbet Gidey and Dawit Seyaum. World indoor 1500m champion Gudaf Tsegay, who won the Olympic bronze medal behind Sifan Hassan and Hellen Obiri at the Olympic Games in Tokyo last year, is only a reserve in the Ethiopian team for this distance.

Taye set the world lead and the fifth best performance in history at the Wanda Diamond League meeting in Eugene last May with her PB of 14:12.98, breaking the Hayward Field record. Last March she won the world indoor bronze medal in the 3000m in Belgrade. In her only other race she finished third behind Eilish McColgan and Gidey in the 10000m in Hengelo.

Gidey finished second to Taye in the 5000m at the Prefontaine Classic in 14:24.59 and third in 14:26.92 in another 5000m Diamond League race in Oslo in 14:26.92.

Seyaum won two Diamond League in Birmingham in 14:47.55 and in Oslo in 14;25.84. She won the world under 20 title in the 1500m in Eugene in 2014 and the world indoor silver medal in Portland 2016.

The Kenyan team will be led by Margaret Chelimo Kipkemboi, who won the world silver medal in the 5000 metres in Doha 2019 behind Hellen Obiri,  and world under 20 cross country champion Beatrice Chebet, who won the world under 20 gold medal in the 5000m in Tampere 2018 beating Taye.

Francine Nyonsaba from Burundi has withdrawn from the World Championships, as she was diagnosed with the beginning of a stress fracture.

The European challenge is led by Karoline Grovdal from Norway, who placed fourth in the 5000m at the Bislett Games in Oslo breaking the national record with 14:31.07 in front of her home fans. Grovdal won two European bronze medals in the 10000m in Amsterdam 2016 and in the 3000m steeplechase in Berlin 2018.

10000 metres: 

Sifan Hassan made her seasonal debut in the 5000 metres with a win in 15.13.41 at the Stumptown Twilight in Portland on 8 July. The Dutch athlete needed time to recover from her efforts of the long 2021 season, where she won two Olympic gold medals in the 5000m and in the 10000m and the bronze in the 1500m in Tokyo.

Hassan is entered in the 1500m, 5000m and 10000m, but she will drop one of these three events.

Hassan, who won the double world gold medal in the 1500m and the 10000m in Doha 2019, would become the second woman to successfully defend the 10000m world title after Tirunesh Dibaba’s back-to-back titles in Helsinki 2005 and Osaka 2007.

Hassan will go head-to-head against Letesenbet Gidey, who broke Hassan’s world record in the 10000m clocking 29:01,03 in Hengelo in June 2021. Gidey won silver at the World Championships in Doha 2019 and bronze medal at the Olympic Games in Tokyo. Last May Gidey broke the world half marathon record clocking 1:02:52 in Valencia. In her only 10000 m race in 2022 Gidey finished second to liz McColgan in Hengelo in 30:44.27. The Hengelo race doubled up as the Ethiopian Trials for the World Championships. Taye made her 10000m debut in Hengelo, finishing third in 30:44.68.

Hellen Obiri opted to compete in the 10000 metres in Eugene instead of making an attempt to win her third consecutive world 5000m  gold medal after her triumphs in London 2017 and Doha 2019. The Kenyan athlete placed fifth at the World Championships in London 2017 and fourth at the Olympic Games in Doha 2019.

The best European runner in the field is Eilish McColgan, who won the 10000m in Hengelo in 30:19.02 moving up to fifth on the European all-time list behind Sifan Hassan, Paula Radcliffe, Lornah Kiplagat and Ingrid Kristiansen. McColgan also improved the Scottish record her mother Liz McColgan set on the same Dutch track in 1991.

The line-up also features Germany’s Konstanze Klosterhalfen, who won the world bronze medal in the 5000m in Doha and finished eighth in the 10000m at the Olympic Games in Tokyo, 2016 African champion Sheila Kiprotich from Kenya, and 2015 world bronze medallist Emily Infield from the USA.

3000 metres steeplechase: 

Kenyan-born Winfred Mutile Yavi from Barhein and Norah Jeruto from Kazakhstan will fight for the gold medal.

Jeruto won the 3000m steeplechase at the Prefontaine Classic in Eugene last May in 8:57.97 beating Yavi (8:58.71). Jeruto also won the 2021 editin of the Eugene meeting in 2021 setting the third fastest time on the world all-time list with 8:53.65.

Yavi, who finished fourth at the World Championships in Doha 2019, took the win in the Paris Diamond League improving Jeruto’s world lead with 8:56.55.

Twenty-year-old Ethiopian runner Mekides Abebe finished fourtb in the Olympic final in Tokyo and third in this year’s Prefontaine Classic in 9:03.26.

Peruth Chemutai is seeking Uganda’s first medal in the 3000m steeplechase at the World Championships since Dorcus Inzikuru’s gold medal in Helsinki 2005. Chemutai won the Olympic  gold medal in Tokyo in a national record of 9:01.45 and finished fourth at the 2022 Prefontaine Classic in 9:05.54.

The Ethiopian team is formed by Werkuha Getachew and 17-year-old Sembo Almayew. Getachew won the African title last month and finished fifth in Eugene in a PB of 9:07.91. Almayew improved her PB of 9:09,19 in Paris last month.

Kenya will be represented by reigning world champion and record holder Jackline Chepkoech, Beatrice Chepkoech, Chepllifine Chepsol and Purity Kirui.

Chepsol, who set the world under 20 record of 8:58.78 in Eugene in 2017, clocked a seasonal best of 9:10.17. Jackline Chepkoech showed her good form winning the Kenyan Trials last June. Beatrice Chepkoech will defend her title won in Doha, but she has run just one race over this distance clocking 9:28.34 at altitude last May.

The US team will be represented by 2017 world champion and 2016 Olympic bronze medal Emma Coburn, who won her 10th US title in 9:10.63, Courtney Frerichs, Olympic silver medallist in Tokyo 2021 in a PB of 9:04.79, and reigning NCAA champion Courtney Wayment.

4×100 relay: 

Jamaica starts as the big favourite for the world 4×100 title one year after the Olympic triumph in Tokyo. The Caribbean team features the two fastest women in the world in history (Shelly Ann Fraser Pryce and Elaine Thompson Herah) and this year’s Jamaican champion Sherika Jackson. They will be joined in the team by 4×100 relay Olympic champion Briana Williams, Kemba Nelson, a graduate at the University of Oregon, and Ramona Burchell.

Olympic 200m bronze medallist Gabby Thomas had to settle with eighth place in the 200m at the US Championships in 22.47 after an injury, but she was selected in the 4×100 relay. Thomas will be joined by US 100m champion Melissa Jefferson, Aleia Hobbs and Twanisha Terry, Celera Barnes and under 20 sprinter Tamari Davis.

Great Britain will try to repeat the podium position one year after winning the bronze medal at the Olympic Games. The British team will be formed by Dina Asher Smith, Darriyl Neita, Imani Lansiquot, Asha Phillip, Ashleigh Nelson and Bianca Williams.

Switzerland will chase a medal after placing fourth at the World Championships in Doha and at the Olympic Games in Tokyo. Swiss 100m and 200m record holder Mujinga Kambundji will be joined by Olympic finalist Ajla Del Ponte, Geraldine Frey, Sarah Atcho and Natasha Kouni. Switzerland clocked 42.13 in the final test in the Stockolm Diamond League meeting, missing the national record by 0.08.

Germany also fields a strong team featuring Rebekka Haase, Alexandra Burghardt, Tatjana Pinto and Gina Luckenkemper. The other team fighting for a spot in the final are the Netherlands, Poland and Italy.

4×400 relay: 

The US team has won six of the past seven world titles and is set to continue its dominance. Last year they triumphed at the Olympic Games with a dream team formed by Allyson Felix, Sydney McLaughlin, Athing Mu and Dalilah Muhammad. The athletes named for Oregon 2022 are the top three finishers of the US Championships Talitha Diggs, Kendall Ellis and Lynna Irby, 2019 world championships fourth placer Jadeline Jonathas, Jaide Stepter and Kailyn Whitney.

The Jamaican team will be formed by Stephanie Ann MCPherson, who won the world 4×400 title in Beijing 2015, Olympic fifth placer Candice McLeod and NCAA Finals second placer Charokee Young.

Poland won silver medals at the World Championships in Doha 2019 and at the Olympic Games in Tokyo 2021. The Polish team is formed by Natalia Kaczmarek and Anna Kielbasinska, who set PBs of 50.16 and 50.28 this year, 2018 European champion Justyna Swiety Ersetic, and Iga Baumgart.

British champion Victoria Ohuruogu (younger sister of 2008 Olympic champion Christine Ohuuogu) will lead a strong British team.

The Netherlands finished sixth in the Olympic  final with a strong team featuring Femke Bol and Lieke Klaver.

The other teams who can fight for a spot in the final are Canada (fourth at the Olympic Games in Tokyo) and Bahamas with Shaunae Miller Uibo, Italy, World Relay champions Cuba and Olympic finalists Belgium.

Mixed 4×400 relay: 

Dominican Republic will chase another global medal one year after finishing second to Poland at the Olympic Games in Tokyo. Olympic 400m silver medallist Marileidy Paulino leads a very strong team that also features Fiordaliza Cofil, who clocked 50.38 this year, Ibero American champion Lidio Feliz, who clocked 44.64 this year, and Alexander Ogando, who set his PBs of 44.68 in the 400m in Chorzow and 20.03 in the 200m in Paris.

The US team won the inaugural title in the mixed 4×400 setting a world record of 3:09.34 in Doha 2019. Sprint legend Allyson Felix has been included in the mixed relay in her final appearance at the World Championships after finishing sixth in the 400m at the US Championships. Felix will go for the 18th medal of her career at the World Championships. The US mixed relay team also features 400m world leader Michael Norman.

Jamaica could fight for a medal after finishing third in Doha three years ago.

The Netherlands features Femke Bol, Liemarvin Bonevacia, Lieke Klaver and Ramsey Angela.

Source: watchathletics.com

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